Abstract

Fermentation Potentiates Antimotility Properties of Chamomile Ligulate Flower Extracts

Author(s): S. Vukmirovic, Milica Kusturica*, B. Milijasevic, Jovana Trifunovic, Ana Tthomas and M. Mikov
Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS University, Mysore to Bangalore Main Road, Near Fire Station, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysore-570 015, India

Correspondence Address:
Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS University, Mysore to Bangalore Main Road, Near Fire Station, Sri Shivarathreeshwara Nagar, Mysore-570 015, India


Matricaria recutita L. (Asteraceae) is one of the most ancient medical herbs, although the therapeutic uses and health benefits of chamomile are based largely on tradition. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chamomile extract on the intestinal motility. Due to the fact that preparation techniques could significantly alter the glucoside content in the chamomile, we also explored the possible differences in the effects on gastrointestinal motility between native and fermented chamomile extract. Thirty minutes after the administration of saline or chamomile ligulate flower extracts, all animals were orally administered charcoal meal by gavage (0.6 ml emulsion–0.4 g Carbo medicinalis and 0.2 g Gummi arabicum in 10 ml of olive oil). Animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation 30 min after charcoal meal administration. Intestinal motility was estimated according to the distance between Carbo medicinalis and pylorus in centimeters. Both native and fermented extract decreased intestinal motility compared to control. Native chamomile extract (5 mg/kg) and fermented chamomile extract (2.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased intestinal motility compared to control group (NE5=27.41±2.79, P<0.05; FE2.5=28.43±14.63, CON=40.34±5.46, P<0.05). These findings confirmed the basis of the use of chamomile extracts in traditional medicine for the treatment and management of digestive system disorders.



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