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Abstract

Impact of Mummy Substance on the Proliferation and Migration of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells and Fibroblasts in Separate or Co-culture Model

Author(s): S. Hassanpour Khodaie, L. Roshangar, S. Sabetkam, J. Soleimani Rad*
Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Stem Cell Research Center, Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, E-mail: [email protected]


Wound healing is critical to the regeneration of various organs and tissues. Traditional medicines, notably mummy, could serve as an alternative stimulator for the treatment of wounds. Till date, mummy has been used for the modulation of inflammation, articular injuries, and bone fractures, as well as wound healing. This study aims to evaluate the effect of mummy on the proliferation and migration of human adipose-derived stem cells and fibroblasts in single or co-culture in vitro conditions. The effective concentration of mummy substance was determined on fibroblasts and adipose-derived stem cells. The cells were treated with mummy separately or co-cultured over a period of 96 h. In vitro scratch assay was used to monitor cell migration rate. Effectiveness of mummy in inducing proliferation was evaluated by measuring the Ki-67 expression using flow cytometry analysis. Based on the data obtained, mummy was found to generate significant increase in the migration of fibroblasts as compared to untreated control in single culture system. On the other hand, an increased migration rate was recorded for adipose-derived stem cells, but it did not reach significant levels. Interestingly, the migration rate of co-cultured fibroblast and adipose-derived stem cells improved after exposure to mummy compared to matched controls. Incubation of adipose-derived stem cells, but not fibroblasts with mummy profoundly increased the expression of Ki-67 as compared to untreated cells. No significant effects were observed in the co-culture system. These data suggested that mummy altered the dynamics of stem cells and mature fibroblasts in vitro. Distinct cell responses could possibly be affected with regard to different cell types.

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