All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Abstract

Nursing Utility and Relevant Mechanism of Boric Acid in Promoting Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice

Author(s): L. Chen
Anhui Suzhou, Anhui Health Vocational College, Anhui, China

Correspondence Address:
Anhui Suzhou, Anhui Health Vocational College, Anhui, China, E-mail: [email protected]

In order to explore the nursing utility and relevant mechanism of boric acid in promoting wound healing of diabetic mice, a total of 36 healthy male mice were randomly divided into the control group (group A) and the experimental group (group B) to construct the diabetic mouse model. Each mouse model was built with 3 different wounds and the changes in expressions of Tgf-β1 and collagen I in the wound tissue were detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed the body weight of diabetic mice in group B was significantly lower than that of the control mice in group A, while the plasma glucose increased significantly. In addition, in group A mice both saline and boric acid could increase the expression levels of Tgf-β1 in wound tissues and the drug combination of povidone-iodine, hydrogen peroxide and boric acid could increase the expression levels of collagen I in wound tissue, thereby promoting the wound healing, while in group B mice, boric acid alone could increase the expression levels of Tgf-β1 and collagen I in wound tissue and promoted wound healing. Therefore, boric acid solution could promote wound healing in diabetic mice and the mechanism could be associated with the increased expression of Tgf-β1 and Collagen I. Despite the deficiencies in the research process, it has provided certain basis and ideas for subsequent research.

Full-Text | PDF

 
 
Google scholar citation report
Citations : 53647

Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences received 53647 citations as per google scholar report