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Abstract

Phytotherapeutic Interventions using Rodent Models of Hair Loss: Current Research and Future Strategy

Author(s): P. S. JOSHI*, Y. B. PATIL, TANIA S. PAUL AND KISHORI G. APTE
Symbiosis School of Biological Sciences, Symbiosis International (Deemed University), Pune, Maharashtra 412115, 1Symbiosis Centre for Research and Innovation, Symbiosis International (Deemed University), Pune, Maharashtra 412115, 2APT Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra 411041, India

Correspondence Address:
Symbiosis School of Biological Sciences, Symbiosis International (Deemed University), Pune, Maharashtra, E-Mail: [email protected]


Hair follicles are special additions to mammalian skin with intricate differentiation and growth characteristics. They constantly undergo cycles of regression and regeneration throughout the lifespan of animal. Several rodent models have been studied for androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata in humans with only handful of products approved by United States Food and Drug Administration; topical minoxidil (men and women) and oral finasteride (only men) for hair loss indication. This review summarizes rodent models of human hair loss to emphasize their role in testing traditional medicinal plants as hair growth promoters. Review also discusses the mechanisms of action of various herbs. Currently, both natural and synthetic products are in use to remedy alopecia. Although, use of natural products has shown measurable efficacy, the option is open to test chemically synthesized active fractions of plants as monotherapy or polytherapy to facilitate approval by regulatory agencies. Overall, purpose of this review is to discuss the rodent models of efficacy and how modifications in herbal preparations may bring more alternatives and a better value to the products in future.

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