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Abstract

The Relationship between Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Precancerous Lesions

Author(s): L. YU, X. MA, Y. HUA, X. YU1, N. YAN1 AND Z. LI*
Department of Dermatology, The Affiliated Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, 123 Tianfei Road, Nanjing,210004 Jiangsu, 1Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine,1-1 Zhongfu Road, Nanjing, 210003 Jiangsu, China

Correspondence Address:
Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine,1-1 Zhongfu Road, Nanjing, 210003 Jiangsu, China, E-mail: [email protected]


In order to explore the relationship between human papillary virus infection and cervical cancer, 1021 women were randomly selected from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2018 in The Second Hospital of Nanjing. Thin-layer cytology test examination, colposcopy and cervical specimen analysis were carried out on all cases. Relevant data were collected and analyzed statistically. The results showed that in the analysis of single infection and multiple infection rates of human papillomavirus positive women, it was found that the multiple infection rate of human papillomavirus in women with high cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer was significantly higher than that in women with normal and inflammatory lesions and women with low cervical precancerous lesions (p<0.01). In the analysis of the influence of age on the status of cervical cancer, it was found that the incidence of cervical high lesion increased significantly (p<0.01) with increasing age. In the analysis of the integration status of human papillomavirus 16 genome, it was found that the integration degree of human papillomavirus 16 in cervical tissue cells was significantly (p<0.01) correlated with the degree of cervical lesions. Therefore, this investigation revealed that the degree of cervical lesions could be controlled by interfering with the integration of human papillomavirus 16 in cervical tissue cells. Although there have been a few short comings, these results would still provide evidence and guidance for the treatment of cervical precancerous lesions by human papillomavirus.

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